How the 70/20/10 Model Can Help Mid-Market CEOs Develop Their Talent

How the 70/20/10 Model Can Help Mid-Market CEOs Develop Their Talent

Understanding when and how this model should be applied is essential if your company is to remain competitive in developing its talent.

Are you ready to position your company as a leader in attracting and developing talent? If so, then the 70/20/10 model is an essential framework. This approach to learning and development encourages people to use a combination of on-the-job training, formal learning experiences, and informal learning opportunities for continued self-development. It is a simple yet effective design for developing and promoting top performers in your organization.

The more your talent grows in the right areas, the more likely you will have more top performers. The 70/20/10 model for learning and development states:

  • On-the-job learning and experience (70%) This can take many forms, such as team-based projects, job shadowing, and stretch assignments. The most significant advantage of this type of learning is that it is highly relevant to your current job. And there is a high degree of transfer since the vast majority can be applied at work, reinforcing the learning.
  • Interactions with others (20%) Feedback is critical for learning to happen over time. Marc Effron, the author of 8 Steps to High Performance, states you should think of growth as a cycle where you perform, get feedback, which informs the process and allows you to perform better. And the faster you move through the cycle, the quicker you develop.
  • Formal learning and training (10%) This is where you provide employees with access to training and continuing education classes. Formal education opportunities enabled learning from experts and thought leaders in their respective fields, allowing employees to stay up-to-date on the latest research and best practices in their field.

These percentages should make sense. If you learn primarily through traditional education classes, you will never get enough practice to implement those study principles. If the feedback and interactions you get from others dominate, you are not practicing enough to improve; instead, you only hear what you did wrong.

Feedback is critical for learning to happen over time. Marc Effron, the author of 8 Steps to High Performance, states you should think of growth as a cycle where you perform, get feedback, which informs the process and allows you to perform better. And the faster you move through the cycle, the quicker you develop.

Formal education opportunities enable learning from experts and thought leaders in their respective fields, allowing employees to stay up-to-date on the latest research and best practices.

To fulfill their employees’ various demands, you should provide multiple formal training and development choices, such as conferences, in-person seminars, and online courses.

The rise of the internet and the current plethora of online and mobile learning tools have altered how the training industry views the 70-20-10 model. Many training specialists contend that it is an antiquated paradigm that does not reflect the market’s emphasis on informal learning, which is developing quickly. In fact, recent research has discovered that, in general, across industries, roles, and even countries, employees learn new knowledge, skills, and abilities with a new ratio known as the OSF (on-the-job, social, formal)ratio.

The 70/20/10 development model still offers an excellent development framework, even though the OSF ratio of learning practices has become more popular and relevant due to recent technological developments. Understanding when and how these models should be applied is essential if mid-market CEOs are to ensure their organizations remain competitive in developing talent in today’s demanding business landscape.

Charles Good 
President, Institute for Management Studies
775-322-8222  |  ims-online.com  |  charles@ims-online.com

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